This is all old hat for us. We know how great of a human being Steve Nash is. So to read this story from the Basketball Jones won't surprise any of us, including this excerpt:

I saw Nash’s humanity for the first time four years ago, during the first NBA game I ever covered. It was a preseason matchup between the Suns and Seattle SuperSonics (RIP), held in Vancouver (also RIP). After tossing his shoes into the crowd, Nash walked into a packed interview room to talk to all of the reporters that had come out to see him. On his way, he noticed a family in the back of the room. The family had recently lost their son. Nash immediately went over to them and comforted them, hugging, talking, smiling and looking at photos of their son that was gone far too soon. While we waited, silently touched by the emotion openly being shown by the family and by the genuine humanity being shown by Nash, we all knew we were watching something beautifully real born out of a painfully fresh tragedy.

Unfortunately or fortunately-depending on how you feel about the man, Paul Shirley weighed on leadership, thoughts on Amar'e Stoudemire, and a comparison between how Nash leads versus Kobe Bryant:

Like, Nash is not only going to tell you, “Hey, I need you to do this,” he’ll come back and say “Thank you for doing that, I appreciate it.” Bryant is apt to roll his eyes when a teammate misses a shot.

And for those of us who wonder why it has been so difficult to jettison Nash to a winner and complete the rebuild of the Suns, it is stories like these that make it so hard for us to see a day when this leader takes off his Suns jersey for the last time, never to wear the purple and orange again.


David Stern Takes Pay Cut, Still Remains Very Smug

"Since the players get 57 percent of every dollar and we've seen their salaries go from $250,000-a-year to $5.2 million... I actually take some pride in that, because that meant that the revenues were growing, and we could be in a position to see players making that much money." From Andrew Sharp/SB



Although the NBA lockout is still in full effect, there are still some exciting basketball games and exhibitions going on to help the fans satisfy their cravings.  One such event is the Sprite Slam Dunk Showdown featuring amateur dunk contestants from around the country.  Ten semi-finalists have been chosen out of hundreds of contestants, and now the fans will choose who will move on to compete in the championship

Fans are encouraged to visit the site nba.com/dunk to watch videos of the ten semi-finalists, and then vote for their favorite two dunkers before August 12th.  The four semi-finalists with the most online votes will be chosen to compete for a chance to win $10,000 in the Sprite Slam Dunk Showdown Championship in 2012.

Take a look at the last Sprite Slam Dunk Showdown Championship earlier this year in which Haneef "Young Hollywood" Munir competed against Terry "T-Dub" Cournoyea.

Who will be the champion in 2012?  Visit the Sprite Slam Dunk showdown site and take a look at the contestants and then cast your votes!


Well, now the lawyers are winning. Again. 

Today the NBA filed suit against the players union for "unfair labor practices." They also filed a charge with the National Labor Relations Board. 

In response to the report, NBA analyst David Aldridge stated, "I am not optimistic that season will start on time."

You think so? Quite a reach, Dave.

The story goes on to describe the acrimony between the two sides that could remind one of another recent battle between two opposing sides that need to work together for the common good, instead of continuing their own privatewar:

Both actions are reactions to recent threats by the players' union that were hampering negotiations, the NBA said in a statement.

Vague. But David Stern Jr. er Adam Silver had this to say:

"These claims were filed in an effort to eliminate the use of impermissible pressure tactics by the union which are impeding the parties' ability to negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement."

Blah, Blah, Blah, Blah. Yadda, yadda, yadda.

Remember several years ago when the NHL found itself in a lockout situation? The rancor was so heavy from players and fans alike towards Gary Bettman, threats were made on his and his family's lives. I can't help but think the public perception of Silver and Stern is that of two arrogant little men prohibiting  a fans desire to watch their favorite game and watch their favorite players.  Maybe it isn't perception, maybe reality, nevertheless, they are very capable of doing some serious, irreparable damage to the league's reputation.

The people won't stand for it.

Links to the story:

CNN

NBA: Nothing But Attorneys?: Wojo/Yahoo


Marcin Gortat Responds To Story About His Lopez Comments

We tracked Marcin down in Poland so he'd have a chance to clarify or correct anything from the previous story.

Read his comments and decide for yourself.


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